Anatomy of A Crisis: Ten Years On

Appraising the institutional response to the 2007-08 financial crash and the political consequences that emerged in its aftermath.

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Levantine Charnel House: An Analytical and Moral Cul-de-sac

Scratch the surface, and the sectarian nature of the Syrian civil war is a subterranean expression of an utterly alienated majority involved in an intense class struggle. Evidently, it is the outward religiosity of these marginalized classes that many observers on the Anglophone left are obsessed with, and in the process have operationalized standard Islamophobic tropes that… Continue reading Levantine Charnel House: An Analytical and Moral Cul-de-sac

Svetlana Boym on Nostalgia

Out of the debris of the Post-Cold War, neoliberalism’s ideological mantra - the “dictatorship of no alternatives” as Roberto Unger called it - succeeded in terminating the possibility of future-oriented utopia, leaving a nostalgic utopianism to curdle in its wake. Only it is a utopia that is no longer directed towards the future. The Russian-American philologist… Continue reading Svetlana Boym on Nostalgia

France: the choice

Given the stress that French capital is under, and Thatcherite François Fillon’s tarnished candidacy, heterodox economist Michael Roberts argues that political upstart and centrist Emmanuel Macron is the only viable presidential candidate that can secure a pro-EU, pro-neoliberal order amongst the anti-systemic alternatives. Some valuable pre-election analysis:

Michael Roberts Blog

It’s only a week to go before the first round of the French presidential election and it seems that the race is wide open.  Only two candidates can take part in the second round in May.  But who will those two be?  Extreme right-wing Front National candidate Marine Le Pen has been the front runner in the polls over the last year, but her support has been slipping.  Ex-socialist minister and centrist darling of the bourgeois media, Emmanuel Macron is neck and neck with Le Pen, both at around 22-23%.  The official conservative (Republican) candidate Francois Fillon should be ahead, but he has been damaged by the expenses scandal of his wife and children getting huge government-funded salaries for parliamentary work which they did not do.  Even so, Fillon is getting about 18-19% share of those saying they will vote.  The big surprise in the last few weeks had been…

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